Home > Narcissistic Personality Disorder, Social Commentary > The Ego Epidemic: Narcissism Is On the Rise

The Ego Epidemic: Narcissism Is On the Rise


There’s an interesting article on the rise of narcissism at the Mail Online, “The ego epidemic: How more and more of us women have an inflated sense of our own fabulousness. The author, Lucy Taylor, cites research by Jean M. Twenge, PhD and W. Keith Campbell, PhD in their book, The Narcissism Epidemic: Living in the Age of Entitlement. W. Keith Campbell, PhD has also researched and written about narcissism as it pertains to social media platforms. His work is cited in the post, Social Media Platforms, Narcissists, Borderlines and Histrionics: The Lure of Blogs, Facebook and MySpace.

In the Mail’s article, Ms Taylor shares the following research from Twenge and Campbell:

According to the American research, there has been a 67 per cent increase in it over the past two decades, mainly among women.

An estimated ten per cent of the population suffers from narcissism as a full-blown personality disorder.

The symptoms include: a grandiose sense of self-importance; the belief that he or she is special or unique and in some way better – either intellectually or physically – than others; a requirement for excessive admiration; a sense of entitlement, whether to fame, fortune, success and happiness or simply to special treatment; enviousness of others or a belief that others are envious of him or her; an inability to empathise; an inability to admit a mistake; and haughty behaviour or attitude.

What researchers have also identified, and are far more worried about, is what has been described as ‘normal’ narcissism – a cultural shift that has seen even non-narcissistic people seduced by the emphasis on material wealth, physical appearance and celebrity worship.

The researchers believe our culture brings out narcissistic behaviour in almost all of us.

They blame the internet (where ‘fame’ is a click away), reality television (where the lure of fame without talent is most prevalent), easy credit (which enables people to buy far beyond their ability to pay), celebrity worship, our highly consumerist, competitive and individualistic society, and a generation of indulgent parents who have raised their children to think they’re special, amazing and perfect.

According to Twenge, this focus on self-admiration has caused a cultural flight from reality to the land of grandiose fantasy.

 

We have phony rich people (who actually have massive mortgages and piles of debt), phony beauty (via plastic surgery), phony celebrities (via reality TV and YouTube), phony genius students (with grade inflation) and phony friends (with the social networking explosion).

Attention is a powerful reinforcement for individuals with narcissistic traits and/or anyone who craves validation and recognition. Many don’t seem to care if the attention they receive is for good or bad behavior or, worse yet, are unable to see how destructive and out of whack the behaviors for which they receive attention are. Attention is attention; it doesn’t seem to matter whether it’s good or bad attention to these individuals. Often the most entitled and/or dysfunctional voices dominate.

Ms Taylor further explores the rise of narcissism and its effect on dating. Women with narcissistic traits often have an over-inflated sense of themselves that has very little to do with how attractive or successful they are in reality. Ms Taylor goes on to interview Margaret Medhurt who owns and runs a dating service in the UK. Ms Medhurt has noticed the increase of narcissism in female clients over the last 30 years and discusses how it impacts her business:

‘It used to be that most women who joined a dating agency had a pretty good idea of where they stood in the eligibility stakes,’ she said. ‘But in the past few years, I’ve noticed that there are a significant number of women who don’t.

‘They tend to be in their 30s, and there is a wide discrepancy between how they perceive themselves and how others see them.

‘They are often very plain, but see themselves as being absolutely fabulous, exceptional people.

‘They invariably reject every guy’s profile I send them. But if a guy rejects their profile, there is all hell to pay. There is disbelief. They are really saying: “I’m so fabulous. How dare he turn me down?”

‘In the past few years, I’ve noticed a real sense of entitlement among this small group of women. The idea that a guy might not find them as amazing as they find themselves doesn’t enter their head.

‘They often become indignant and angry towards me, demanding to know why a guy dared to turn them down. Most people simply accept the facts of the dating game: some people will find you attractive and others won’t, in the same way that you’ll be drawn to some but not others.

‘These women, however, are unable to get their heads around the fact that the rest of the world might not share the distorted, inflated view they have of themselves.’

Ms Taylor also interviews, David Baxter, a 40-year old management consultant who recently re-entered the dating pool after being married for 9 years. He states:

‘I’ve had three successive dates recently with ladies in the late 30s to early 40s age bracket that have left me dumbfounded.’

‘I’ve never come across such massive egos, such arrogance and lack of basic courtesy.

‘It was as if these particular dates were a forum for them to tell me how exceptional they were. One told me repeatedly how many young guys at the gym asked her out; another was very artificial.

‘You sensed that they absolutely worshipped themselves, though none of them was drop-dead gorgeous or had amazing personalities, jobs or anything else to set them apart and elevate themselves into some superior position.

‘I also thought it was quite telling that none of them had ever been married, engaged or had recently – or perhaps ever – been in a long-term relationship.

‘I got the feeling that these women were living in a Sex And The City-inspired fantasy world. I also sensed that nobody would ever be good enough for them.

For those who are familiar with these issues, the material discussed in the article is no big surprise. However, it’s worth the read and also worth noting when mainstream publications acknowledge these issues. Thanks to the reader who sent the link to the article.

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  1. September 15, 2010 at 6:44 pm

    Hey Dr. T,

    Another well-written post. And timely….
    It HAS become like an epidemic, hasn’t it? I was just reading another article on the new ‘priv-lit’ or the ‘eat-pray-spend’ message as opposed to eat-party-spend where the Blahniks and Birkins have now been replaced by expensive-exotic-soul-searching-vacation trend. But at the end, in both scenarios the bottomline message is: ‘Me, me, me, I spend-on-me, YOU spend-on-me, spend-and-mend-me-till-you-bend while I-alone-hold-the-right-to-offend.’

    I read this hilarious list yesterday that a friend sent..it’s an old one…and whether they’re all attributed to Bill Gates or not to a speech he gave to high school students, (and whatever glitches Windows might have), certainly thought it was good old-fashioned wisdom and a spank on the overtly-self-entitled-bottoms that constitue the ego epidemic:

    Rule 1: Life is not fair – get used to it!

    Rule 2 : The world won’t care about your self-esteem. The world will expect you to accomplish something BEFORE you feel good about yourself.

    Rule 3 : You will NOT make $60,000 a year right out of high school. You won’t be a vice-president with a car phone until you earn both.

    Rule 4 : If you think your teacher is tough, wait till you get a boss.

    Rule 5 : Flipping burgers is not beneath your dignity. Your Grandparents had a different word for burger flipping: they called it opportunity.

    Rule 6: If you mess up, it’s not your parents’ fault, so don’t whine about your mistakes, ‘learn from them’.

    Rule 7: Before you were born, your parents weren’t as boring as they are now. They got that way from paying your bills, cleaning your clothes and listening to you talk about how cool you thought you were. So before you save the rain forest from the parasites of your parent’s generation, try delousing the closet in your own room.

    Rule 8: Your school may have done away with winners and losers, but life HAS NOT. In some schools, they have abolished failing grades and they’ll give you as MANY TIMES as you want to get the right answer. This doesn’t bear the slightest resemblance to ANYTHING in real life.

    Rule 9: Life is not divided into semesters. You don’t get summers off and very few employers are interested in helping you FIND YOURSELF. Do that on your own time.

    Rule 10: Television is NOT real life. In real life people actually have to leave the coffee shop and go to jobs.

    Rule 11: Be nice to nerds. Chances are you’ll end up working for one.

  2. Brian
    September 15, 2010 at 3:35 pm

    After a year of leaving and divorcing a NPD/BPD exWife I have learned quite a bit about PD’s in Men and even more importantly Women!

    Regarding this article, as I have started to date again, I too have found that many of my dates have been with attractive professional women who have a “shoot for the moon/perfection” objective in dating. Some EXPECT to be worship by their date, provided the best of everything and often can only talk about themselves. Having them ask a question about me or my interests seems to be outside their personal awareness, which I believe is the root of the problem. They are only aware of their own demands and desires and lack any awareness of others and as well as self-awareness (how they act, what they say, and how it is percieved by others. This article scratches the surface of a very important topic for me.

    Also I thank Dr. Tara for her work (Shrink For Men) and her professional advisory to me personally and definitely recommend others who have not had a paid consultation with her to do so. Even though I have regularly seen a local therapist (2000+ miles away from Dr. Tara) with experience with men leaving PD partners, I found Dr. Tara’s advice to be very very helpful in a number of ways and supportive of my own local therapists advice.

  3. kiwihelen
    September 15, 2010 at 3:01 pm

    Old Guy,

    You speak my own mind on the issue of “self-esteem for nothing”.

    IMHO (bearing in mind that I don’t have my own kids) the best thing for a kid’s self esteem is attentive and commited parenting, no stupid scheme of awarding prizes to all so none feel bad. I have come to equate good self-esteem in myself with a high level of self-efficacy i.e. I can look after myself and do things to look after myself.

    My parents taught me much of that, and more importantly taught me how to go about aquiring new skills.

    The dating scene is a horror.

  4. Jen
    September 15, 2010 at 1:59 pm

    Old Guy :I agree re: the “self-esteem for nothing” trend of the past twenty – thirty years or so.
    Years ago when our older kids were in primary school, they looked forward to earning a swimming badge at school each year.
    Then the badge program was discontinued because some kids were being “emotionally devastated” when they weren’t able to attain the skills they needed to earn a badge … and lord knows, wouldn’t want them to feel “bad” about themselves.
    This was a big disappointement for our kids, particularly the younger of the two as swimming was about the only thing he had success at in school.
    Like it or not, we learn as much or more from our failures and disappointments as we do our successes … particularly when those successes are manuafactured for us rather than being real accomplishments on our part.
    Too many people walking around these days feeling “good” about themselves without having done anything good to earn that feeling.

    I agree here mostly. But will say, I dont mind if people feel good about themselves. What I do mind is if a person tries to make you feel like a crap over something dumb, petty, unimportant. And I hate people who have to knock you down to make themselves feel “good”. Other then that nothing is wrong with someone being happy with who they are even if they are just average.

    • September 16, 2010 at 12:25 pm

      I agree.

      I don’t think people should be made to feel bad about themselves by some jackass seeking to bolster their own self-esteem, etc.

  5. Jen
    September 15, 2010 at 1:03 pm

    Ok I have to say I thought NPD was my sister in law. For some reason right off the bat she didnt like me and I could just tell( anytime we spent time together for holidays she always looked like a sour puss). With further investigation I found out that 1. she didnt like me because my husband and I took the room in my husbands parents house that they used when they visited. 2 She didnt like me because the day my husband and i got married was her and her husbands dating anniversery..say what?? and 3. When my husbands father was sick in the hospital and “She” couldnt be there,I hugged her husband and she was upset enough to text me a weird message on my cell phone letting me know she was upset about it.lol This on top of extreme moodiness/bossiness/snobbiness. I dont know. I thought maybe she could be BPD too cuz she did cry a few times. I began to feel like I was in high school again with all the pettiness. I felt no normal person could get upset about these things.
    Plus I found out from her own husband that she also got secretly jealous of her own friend because her friend got pregnant at the same time as her. It was weird, welll is weird. We finally had a small blow out because she made my husbands brother take him off his face book. We confronted the brother and he admits his wife is crazy but says he had to do it to save his marriage( they are in marital counseling). I told my husband well thats crappy but atleast we are rid of them. It was very uncomfortable to be around them half the time too because they were that couple that constantly bickered in front of you.And keep in mind these are 2 college educated 30 something adults. Im glad to be away from that mess.But because of this I looked at what she got upset about and saw it as her thinking she should get special treatment.

  6. Mike
    September 15, 2010 at 12:17 pm

    I think that if you want status, work your ass off to get there, and not to expect to get it because you are “special” (and do nothing about it). That´s the difference.
    Yet status is not everything, as flashy as it can be.

  7. Mike
    September 15, 2010 at 12:13 pm

    Tara, it´s funny. I came across this article (http://www.askmen.com/top_10/dating/top-10-signs-shes-a-gold-digger.html) and it goes along well with your post about narcissism. I´ve already noticed the link between goldigging and NPD,BPD,HPD,ASPD people.

    Top 10 Signs She´s a Gold Digger:

    No.10 – She wants expensive gifts
    No.9 – Her friends are gold diggers
    No.8 – She’s curious about your financial status
    No.7 – She never pays
    No.6 – She hates other women
    No.5 – She uses her looks for short-term gain
    No.4 – She’s status-obsessed
    No.3 – She climbs boyfriends
    No.2 – She’s out of your league
    No.1 – She has a sense of entitlement

    Stupid the guys who fall for this game. It´s “prostitution” in a sense.

    • Brian
      September 15, 2010 at 6:54 pm

      Mike :

      Tara, it´s funny. I came across this article (http://www.askmen.com/top_10/dating/top-10-signs-shes-a-gold-digger.html) and it goes along well with your post about narcissism. I´ve already noticed the link between goldigging and NPD,BPD,HPD,ASPD people.
      Top 10 Signs She´s a Gold Digger:
      No.10 – She wants expensive gifts
      No.9 – Her friends are gold diggers
      No.8 – She’s curious about your financial status
      No.7 – She never pays
      No.6 – She hates other women
      No.5 – She uses her looks for short-term gain
      No.4 – She’s status-obsessed
      No.3 – She climbs boyfriends
      No.2 – She’s out of your league
      No.1 – She has a sense of entitlement
      Stupid the guys who fall for this game. It´s “prostitution” in a sense.

      Make that 15 Signs she is a gold digger,

      No.11 – The majority of the time she is only interested in sex (with you) is after you’ve bought her something she wants.

      No.12 – She has a temper tantrum if you refuse to buy something for her.

      No.13 – She only suggests expensive restaurants, resorts, vacations, cars, hotels, clubs, etc. while not offering to pay or contribute a dime towards this time, event or activity together.

      No.14 – She gets angry when you ask her to participate to pay (on No.13) and then states “I came from a home that a man (Father) always paid.”

      No.15 – She earns only a modest income, yet wears expensive clothes and drives expensive cars, etc. and discusses what her father owns/his career on a regular basis (She is still collecting her allowance).

      No.16 – She brags about all the best vacation spots in the world she has visited, but cannot tell you what she liked most about them, what meaningful activities she participated in there. Just where she want to go next (you to pay for and bigger and better than her previous vacations.)

      Also there is only a very fine line between Hooker and Gold Digger. The first accepts cash for the single on-the-spot act or transaction, the other has you on a lifetime payment plan!

      • Chester
        September 18, 2010 at 3:58 pm

        Big red flag for me is the “I love to travel and want the same in my man” Well, think about it….who in the HELL doesn’t like a vacation/travel! Problem is, traveling for two is going to generally run 5 grand a pop. These queens expect that the one with a penis will pick up the tab. 99% of men will go broke on this one. I “had” a buddy that kept his little princess happy by credit card. He’s dead now. Shot himself through the chest.

  8. mellaril
    September 15, 2010 at 12:18 am

    So does that mean if they have an official diagnosis and you don’t go out with them, can they sue you under the Americans With Disabilities Act? It seems like obvious discrimination to me.

    As a college buddy once said of a girl in our dorm, “She ain’t that good looking to be that obnoxious.”

  9. Freedom
    September 15, 2010 at 12:01 am

    Oh i gotta chime in on this one. I have a running joke that goes, “for all of the years i’ve spent in the restaurant biz, the bartending biz, and now the retail biz… if i haven’t completely lost my faith in humanity, then i may never lose it”. Truth is, right now, the job i’m in, i absolutely hate my job. every day i get to come in and experience the pettiness of human nature. i work at a large home improvement chain running the customer service desk. the absurdity of people and their wishes is astounding. but the irony is, 90% of the people who come in or call with with abusive mouths are women!!!

    perfect example is the time i got a phone call at 9am on a sunday morning. now keep in mind that i grew up in a police family, bartended for a number of years, and that my man card is firmly intact. profanity usually doesn’t faze me much. the woman that called has to be the most venomous, poisonous, mouth-mouthed female i’ve ever experienced. she wasn’t calling because of a propane tank she bought blew up and burned her house down, or that a refrigerator she bought konked out and spoiled an evening and several hundred dollars worth of food. NO… i got to listen to a disgusting 20 minute tirade about tile and grout sealer – not exactly a life or death situation. there was no one in flooring at the time, which set her off, then she proceeded to go off on me about how incompetent i am as an employee (because i couldn’t answer her question), what a horrible franchise i work for, and what a poor excuse for a human being i am. this went on for 20 minutes at the top of her lungs!!! so finally i’d had enough and told her “ma’am, if i’m really as incompetent and horrible as you say i am… why in God’s name are you still talking to me? your words have no effect on me because i don’t value your opinion of me”. she screamed like a banshee!!! i finally got a manager on the phone and as it turns out she was completely in the wrong, her questions were about a product she saw on-line – – wait for it – – from a competitor!!! yep… she called the wrong franchise!!! made such a huge scene over her own mistake, left me and the manager cover in verbal vomit, and never had the decency to say she was sorry. instead she told us both to f–k off and hung up the phone.

    now something this bizarre and extreme doesn’t happen everyday, but a lesser version is guaranteed to happen almost everyday. i don’t understand how so many people have this extremely inflated sense of self-importance.

    this is what goes thru my head most days: “no, you can’t talk to a manager right this second because he/she is talking to another customer. if you’d like to wait, when the manager is finished with the other customer he/she will talk to you. profanity at me will not make the manager magically appear. why you ask will the manager not magically appear? because you are no more – and yet no less – important than the person in front of you or the person behind you”.

    and yes… i’ve actually had to threaten to call the police if someone starts making a scene. all for what? nobody got hurt, nobody is disrespecting you, you simply have to stand in line and wait your turn. but people can’t. i’ll have a line backed up 20 feet with customers standing in line being patient, and inevitably some fool will bypass the line to start their own line. i’ll ask how i can help they want the same stuff that everyone else is standing in line about. when i tell the person i’ll be happy to help them after i’ve helped the other people before them, out comes the attitude and the chip on their shoulder.

    UGH!!! people…

    • Dan
      September 15, 2010 at 12:35 pm

      I’m not a huge fan of my military service, I regard the USMC in the class of “sick systems.” I literally read that link and dropped my jaw… anyway being in has definitely fixed my priorities on a lot of issues. Some things today that people find important… words fail me.

  10. Bud
    September 14, 2010 at 11:09 pm

    Something interesting I’ve noticed: A lot of women I’ve come across almost seem to enjoy having some sort of DSM diagnosis. “My doctor told me I have dysthymia. You have to be extra nice to me.”

  11. ron
    September 14, 2010 at 9:44 pm

    jpit right. The ones that are easy to spot are not really dangerous. But, the truly accomplished NPDs are really good at hiding it.
    When I read some of the articles about these folks, like the princess one on this site, I am sure that mst of us were not taken in by someone so obvious.
    So, what does one look for? I think there are subtler, telltale signs.
    I , myself, just get a feeling for it, now. It is hard to pinpoint, but when I meet someone like this, I just listen to my feelings better now. I do not allow her physical beauty to sway me.
    I am especially aware of women who emphasize wealth, power, and status in their appraisals of men. Thye tell you this stuff, if you listen. See what impresses them, what they covet, how shallow most of it is. Then, run.

  12. jp
    September 14, 2010 at 9:28 pm

    We need to be careful. The kinds of narcisstic traits outlined in the book and article being quoted–grandiosity about appearance and position, sense of entitlement, etc.–are relatively easy to spot and hence avoid.

    Much harder to detect early on are those traits not related to appearance and status: need to be right, need for control, lack of empathy, inability to accept responsibility or apologize, the expectation that you read her mind and the disdain she’ll hurl at you when you get it ‘wrong’, etc.

    It’s impossible to see that stuff when you’re being loved bombed because IT ISN’T THERE YET. She may even be humble or even critical about the way she looks, selfless and generous with friends and family, hard-working, etc., it means nothing.

    Be thankful for the ones that let you know early on, like the Match.com profile I saw once where her tagline was “I’m the Boss”. The boss? Really? Next.

    JP

    • Jen
      September 15, 2010 at 1:50 pm

      I agree with you jp. I think people get stuck thinking all narcissists are vain about their looks or jobs, but i doubt they are because I have met the most hidious looking people with average jobs, acting like they are gods gift to the world.

  13. Verbal
    September 14, 2010 at 9:04 pm

    But seriously, I’ve been reading the book by Twenge and Campbell, and it is highly entertaining. Anyone who visits this site regularly will recognize the narcissism they describe.

    My one critique of their work would be that they cite examples of extreme narcissism as though they are part of the new norm. Yes, it is an outrage when a teenager wants a major thoroughfare blocked off for her Sweet Sixteen birthday parade, despite the fact it will disrupt emergency access to a hospital. This kind of thing is the exception. Still, it is clear that the “median” level of narcissism in our society has been increasing over the last few decades.

    But don’t worry, it will only get worse! The dominant child-rearing paradigm in the 90’s was, “Self Esteem is King”. So we have an entire generation of people now coming of age who think they should get an award for just showing up, who’ve never been told “no”, and can’t conceive that in order to be considered “special”, you need to have actually accomplished something. Fasten your seat belts!

    • September 14, 2010 at 9:34 pm

      I agree re: the “self-esteem for nothing” trend of the past twenty – thirty years or so.

      Years ago when our older kids were in primary school, they looked forward to earning a swimming badge at school each year.

      Then the badge program was discontinued because some kids were being “emotionally devastated” when they weren’t able to attain the skills they needed to earn a badge … and lord knows, wouldn’t want them to feel “bad” about themselves.

      This was a big disappointement for our kids, particularly the younger of the two as swimming was about the only thing he had success at in school.

      Like it or not, we learn as much or more from our failures and disappointments as we do our successes … particularly when those successes are manuafactured for us rather than being real accomplishments on our part.

      Too many people walking around these days feeling “good” about themselves without having done anything good to earn that feeling.

  14. Verbal
    September 14, 2010 at 8:49 pm

    Enough about this article. Let’s talk about me.

  15. Dan
    September 14, 2010 at 8:38 pm

    Is it just me, or do I remember the princesses that I grew up watching in movies and reading in books we’re of the humble type… usually abused by their cluster B personality type family members. :)

  16. never again
    September 14, 2010 at 8:23 pm

    Well, this doesn’t bode well for those of us who are trying to jump back into the pool after having had a bad NPD relationship…

    And yes, I avoid the “princesses” on the dating websites, like the plague. OTOH, I’ve put some pretty stringent criteria on my own profile, simply because I’m tired of dealing with the crap, and I’m simply not going to settle. I know I have a lot to offer the right woman, but I’d rather be alone, than lonely with someone. I figure if any woman is confident enough and good-looking enough to take a chance on a guy who’s not going to put up with any nonsense, then she might just be worthwhile.

    Though I’d hate to think that every good looking woman is potentially narcissistic. There have to be some normal women out there.

  17. Ron
    September 14, 2010 at 7:51 pm

    Yes, that is a problem, a cross you need to bear, OLd Guy.

  18. September 14, 2010 at 7:13 pm

    Okay, but what about people like me who truly are “special or unique and in some way better – either intellectually or physically – than others” rather than simply a narcissist wannabe?

    Wait a second …

    LOL.

  19. Ron
    September 14, 2010 at 7:01 pm

    Oh, I came across one woman’s profile on a dating site where she claimed she wanted to be treated like a princess and that it was hard to meet men because her looks scared them off(she was very good looking in her pictures).
    In jest, I wrote to her and feigning that I assumed she was feeling insecure about not being all that.I reassured her,telling her that she should not worry about her looks, as she was very much within the average range and that men who would judge her for her looks were not all that great. I then told her about my problem, that being really good looking was also a hinderance to meeting folks,telling her it was a blessing and a curse.
    Guess she failed to see any humor in it.

    • Chester
      September 15, 2010 at 2:43 am

      I’ve checked out the internet dating gig. Most women profiles read…with some variation. My 3.2 kids come first..family and friends second…and you- dumbass- can be third, providing you have buckets of money to straighten out my mess. They actually list income levels! Always high…and usually higher than their respective incomes.

  20. Ron
    September 14, 2010 at 6:55 pm

    Interesting. I have dated a bit and come across this. I amnot reallytall that gung-ho for a relationship, I guess, but I would be open to it if I met the right woman.
    I have tried to utillze one of the criteria Marc Rudov suggests: if the woman is not willing to pay her share for the date(either splitting it or alternating picking up the tab), I stop seeing her.
    Rudov makes a good point about the signs of entitlement, in that if one sees this during dating, one is apt to see it during the divorce.
    I see a lot of “entitled” women, women like my XW, who feel they are doing you a favor by going out with you. When I was younger, I guess i was pretty good looking and a good athlete and dated a few models. Invariably, the dates sucked and I could see their confusion over why I was not just falling all over myself for them.
    Too many guys are willing to do this, and, they often end up with a real mean, selfish person as their mate. It is a horribly lonely existence.
    My XW is pretty good looking, but, I think she thinks she is way more than she is. I wonder how she rationalizes the fact that no one has ever asked her to be on the cover of Cosmo or some other disgustingly sahllow magazine.

Comment pages
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